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Processing death: Oval brooches and Viking graves in Britain, Ireland and Iceland


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Title: Processing death: Oval brooches and Viking graves in Britain, Ireland and Iceland
Authors: Norstein, Frida Espolin
Issue Date: 19-May-2020
University: Göteborgs universitet. Humanistiska fakulteten
University of Gothenburg. Faculty of Arts
Institution: Department of Historical Studies ; Institutionen för historiska studier
Date of Defence: 2020-06-12
Disputation: Fredagen den 12 juni 2020, kl 13.00 i Lilla hörsalen, Humanisten, Renströmsgatan 6
Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Publication type: Doctoral thesis
Series/Report no.: GOTARC series B. Gothenburg Archaeological Theses
73
Keywords: Oval brooches, Burials, Viking Age, Funerary rituals, Memory, Performance, Death, England, Scotland, Ireland, Iceland
Abstract: Burials with oval brooches from the Viking Age settlements in Britain, Ireland, and Iceland have frequently been interpreted as the graves of a specific and uniform group of people: (pagan) Scandinavian women of relatively high status. This interpretation is partly a result of the way in which the material has been treated, as static entities with more or less fixed meanings. How similar were these graves, however, and can they be interpreted as belonging to a specific group of people? By studyi... more
ISBN: 978-91-85245-79-6
978-91-85245-80-2
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/64094
Appears in Collections:Doctoral Theses from University of Gothenburg / Doktorsavhandlingar från Göteborgs universitet
Doctoral Theses / Doktorsavhandlingar Institutionen för historiska studier

 

 

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