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What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty.


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Title: What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty.
Authors: Baumgartner, Finn
E-mail: finn.baumgartner@bioenv.gu.se
Issue Date: 2-Sep-2013
University: University of Gothenburg. Faculty of Science
Institution: Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences ; Institutionen för biologi och miljövetenskap
Parts of work: I. Baumgartner FA, Toth GB (2013) Elysia viridis abundance and size distribution on co-occurring algal hosts on the Swedish west coast. Unpublished manuscript.

II. Baumgartner FA, Pavia H, Toth GB (2013) Individual specialization to non-optimal hosts in a polyphagous marine invertebrate herbivore. Unpublished manuscript.

III. Baumgartner FA, Toth GB (2013) Kleptoplast functionality in a sea slug varies depending on its macroalgal diet. Unpublished manuscript.

IV. Baumgartner FA, Pavia H, Toth GB (2013) Acquired phototrophy through retention of functional chloroplasts increases growth efficiency of the sea slug Elysia viridis. Unpublished manuscript.
Date of Defence: 2013-09-20
Disputation: Fredagen den 20 september 2013, kl. 14.00, Stora Hörsalen, Institutionen för biologi och miljövetenskap-Tjärnö, Hättebäcksvägen 7, 45296 Strömstad.
Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Publication type: Doctoral thesis
Keywords: Elysia viridis
sacoglossan
herbivore
macroalgae
seaweed
optimal diet theory
individual speciliasation
diet selection
kleptoplasty
phototrophy
Abstract: Understanding the mechanisms involved in resource use by an organism is pivotal to understanding its ecology. A conspecific population that as a whole demonstrates a generalist pattern of resource use may in fact consist of relatively specialized individuals. Elysia viridis, a sacoglossan opisthobranch mollusc, tends to demonstrate this type of sympatric variation in diet, although to differing extents depending on the ontogenetic stage. However, the mechanisms underlying this inter-individual v... more
ISBN: 978-91-628-8749-0
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32881
Appears in Collections:Doctoral Theses from University of Gothenburg / Doktorsavhandlingar från Göteborgs universitet
Doctoral Theses / Doktorsavhandlingar Institutionen för biologi och miljövetenskap

 

 

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