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dc.contributor.authorCarelli, Daniel Eric
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-20T13:09:42Z
dc.date.available2024-05-20T13:09:42Z
dc.date.issued2024-05-20
dc.identifier.isbn978-91-8069-779-8
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2077/80947
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates how variations in civil service arrangements among European states impact concerted governance over antibiotic resistance. Through four standalone research papers, it demonstrates that different institutional setups and degrees of administrative autonomy result in different governance outcomes. Consequently, concerted governance is deeply rooted in the institutionalized structures of domestic politico-administrative arrangements. However, the findings also suggest that even modest administrative reforms have the potential to disrupt the prevailing order. Crucially, the dissertation reveals that granting extensive latitude for action to senior civil servants and experts, driven by epistemic and collaborative values, creates favorable conditions for cross-sectoral and sustained governance. This holds true at both domestic and international levels. The dissertation contributes to the longstanding debate on administrative autonomy and political control, offering new insights into how these crucial factors should be configured for effective governance of collective action issues.sv
dc.language.isoengsv
dc.relation.haspartPierre, Jon, Carelli, Daniel, and B. Guy Peters. (2023). The Four Worlds of Politics and Administration in the EU: How Institutional Arrangements Shape the Struggle Against Antimicrobial Resistance. Journal of European Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1080/13501763.2023.2255223sv
dc.relation.haspartCarelli, Daniel, and Jon Pierre. (2024). When the Cat is Away: How Institutional Autonomy, Low Salience, and Issue Complexity Shape Administrative Action. Public Administration, 102(1), 207-221. https://doi.org/10.1111/padm.12912.sv
dc.relation.haspartCarelli, Daniel. (2024). Ignorance is Bliss? Enhancing Public Awareness of Antimicrobial Resistance through Collaborative Administrative Governance. Unpublished manuscript.sv
dc.relation.haspartCarelli, Daniel. (2024). Drivers of Transnational Administrative Coordination on Super-Wicked Policy Issues: The Role of Institutional Homophily. Unpublished manuscript.sv
dc.subjectGovernance / Administrative Autonomy / Antibiotic Resistance / Institutions.sv
dc.titleBugs and Bureaucracies: Institutions, Administrative Autonomy, and the Governance of Antibiotic Resistancesv
dc.typeText
dc.type.svepDoctoral thesiseng
dc.gup.maildaniel.carelli@gu.sesv
dc.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophysv
dc.gup.originUniversity of Gothenburg. Faculty of Social Scienceseng
dc.gup.originGöteborgs universitet. Samhällsvetenskapliga fakultetenswe
dc.gup.departmentDepartment of Political Science ; Statsvetenskapliga institutionensv
dc.gup.defenceplaceFredagen den 14 juni 2024, kl. 13.15, Torgny Segerstedt, Vasaparken.sv
dc.gup.defencedate2024-06-14
dc.gup.dissdb-fakultetSF


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