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dc.contributor.authorÅngman, Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2024-03-01T14:17:39Z
dc.date.available2024-03-01T14:17:39Z
dc.date.issued2024-03-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2077/80205
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to look into what low-educated and highly-educated young adults aged 20-30 think affects the spread of fake news and how they feel that their trust in news sources is affected when they become increasingly exposed to it. By mapping the respondents' view of the phenomenon of fake news and its influence on their information intake, the study aims to understand whether their trust in news sources is affected. The method that the study will use is a qualitative interview. A qualitative interview is chosen based on the fact that the study aims to get hold of the respondents' opinions and reflections on what they believe causes fake news to spread and how they believe their trust in news sources is affected. Ten respondents between the ages of 20-30 were selected based on a strategic selection that is fulfilled via a snowball sampling. The study has used two theories. The choice of two theories is based on the need to understand both cognitive and interpersonal aspects of information processing. By integrating both the theory Elaboration Likelihood Model and the Mediated Trust Model, the study can expect a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of how cognitive processes and interpersonal factors interact to influence young adults' experience of fake news and trust in news sources. This choice of theories enables a broader contextual analysis of the dynamics behind information processing and trust building. The first question that the study was interested in answering was the following: What do highly educated and poorly educated young adults aged 20-30 think affects the spread of fake news and why? The answer to that question can be summarized as follows: According to ten respondents, a predominant point of view was that fake news is spread to control the discourse and convince others. Above all, they believed that the advancement of technology, especially social media and the Internet, plays a crucial role in the spread. Lack of source criticism, influence from social networks, and the individual's role as a spreader were also identified as factors. Propaganda and political views were highlighted as one of the biggest reasons for the spread of fake news, where false stories can be manipulated to support political goals. The question of how news channels affect the spread of fake news was also a subject of discussion. Some believed that news channels, such as SVT, are considered reliable, while others believed that some news channels contributed to the spread because they have other intentions. The second question that the study aimed to answer was the following: How do both highly educated and poorly educated young adults aged 20-30 feel that their trust in news sources is affected when they become increasingly exposed to fake news? The answer to that question can be summarized as follows: The respondents, when describing their general trust in news sources, express high trust in the sources they use as primary sources. The high level of trust means that they do not consider being critical of the source. In connection with the theories Elaboration Likelihood Model and Mediated Trust Model, it appears that trust, especially within the Mediated Trust Model, can function as a peripheral signal and influence decision-making in the peripheral path according to ELM. When respondents describe how they follow news about current events, their use of primary sources varies, with some preferring daily newspapers while others only use social media. The view of the reliability of news sources changes for certain groups of respondents, where the highly educated more often maintain their high level of trust, while the less educated experience changes to a greater degree. The majority of respondents, regardless of education level, prefer traditional news channels and consider them more reliable than news sources on social media platforms. They emphasize that traditional media are more controlled and impartial, while social media lack a responsible publisher and thus require more individual fact-checking. Subject areas where respondents feel more likely to doubt news reporting include politics, war, celebrities and entertainment, as well as charity and environmental and climate issues. The third question the study aimed to answer was the following: Does the level of education affect the respondents' critical thinking? The answer can be summarized as follows: There was a certain expected difference between the highly educated and the poorly educated but the results show no differences between highly educated and poorly educated young adults' perceptions of factors that influence the spread of fake news. Both groups tend to highlight similar aspects, such as a lack of fact-checking, as influencing factors. This suggests that the level of education is not necessarily a decisive variable for how young adults interpret and understand the phenomenon of fake news. There is also no difference between highly educated and poorly educated young adults' experiences of how their trust in news sources is affected by increased exposure to fake news. Both groups report an increased awareness and caution towards news sources, and there appears to be no direct correlation with education level. This indicates that although young adults' trust is affected by fake news exposure, this effect is not differentiated by their educational background.sv
dc.language.isoswesv
dc.relation.ispartofseries1244sv
dc.subjectFake newssv
dc.titleUNGA VUXNAS UPPFATTNINGAR OM FALSKA NYHETER OCH DERAS TILLIT TILL NYHETSKANALER. En kvalitativ intervjustudiesv
dc.typeText
dc.setspec.uppsokSocialBehaviourLaw
dc.type.uppsokM2
dc.contributor.departmentGöteborgs universitet/Institutionen för journalistik, medier och kommunikationswe
dc.contributor.departmentGöteborg University/Department of Journalism Media and Communicationeng
dc.type.degreeStudent essay


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