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dc.date.accessioned2022-04-19T12:06:03Z
dc.date.available2022-04-19T12:06:03Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2077/71382
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectHand-madeen
dc.subjectTextileen
dc.subjectPodcasten
dc.subjectNorth Europeen
dc.titlePodcast series: Fabric of Society Episode 1: From cottage industry to creative industriesen
dc.type.svepartistic work
dc.contributor.creatorTolnov Clausen, Rosa
dc.contributor.creatorLinnemann, Stine
art.typeOfWork3) Podcasten
art.relation.publishedInSpotifyen
art.description.projectThe podcast series ‘Fabric of Society’ is a vessel with which we explore textile making in the Nordic countries in view to the historical development of the field in its relationships with different economical conditions and environments since the mid 19th century. Along its course, the program discovers and highlights such entangled influences on weaving culture in the domains of material and production technology, environmental impact or gender models, for example. ‘From Cottage Industry to Creative Industries,’ focuses on textile manufacturing in the domestic sphere between 1850 and today, exploring its transition from a moment in which mechanical industry, cottage and home production took place side by side, up to a state of today where domestic textile manufacturing represents but a miniscule fragment of Nordic textile output. The episode features conversations with: • Researcher of Finnish cottage industry Eliza Kraatari • Board member of the association ‘Friends of Finnish Handicraft’ Annika Nyberg • Weaving teacher at the Omnia Adult Education Centre of Espoo City Ritva Kurittu-Kalaja • Leisure-time weaver Reeta Leena Laine • Director ad interim of Museum Midtjylland, Kristine Holm-Jensen • Independent knitwear designer Laura Dalgaard • Chief designer of the social enterprise ‘I tråd med verden,’ Liv Heckmannen
art.description.summary‘From Cottage Industry to Creative Industries,’ focuses on textile manufacturing in the domestic sphere between 1850 and today, exploring its transition from a moment in which mechanical industry, cottage and home production took place side by side, up to a state of today where domestic textile manufacturing represents but a miniscule fragment of Nordic textile output.en
art.description.supportedByOpstart by The Nordic Culture Funden
art.relation.urihttp://www.rosatolnovclausen.com/Fabric-of-Society https://www.stinelinnemann.com/portfolio/fabricofsociety/en


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