GUPEA >
Faculty of Science / Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten >
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences / Institutionen för växt- och miljövetenskaper (-2011) >
Articles / Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences >

Have giant lobelias evolved several times independently? Life form shifts and historical biogeography of the cosmopolitan and highly diverse subfamily Lobelioideae (Campanulaceae)


Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/26567

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
gupea_2077_26567_1.xml247KbXMLView/Open
gupea_2077_26567_2.pdf2249KbAdobe PDF
View/Open
Title: Have giant lobelias evolved several times independently? Life form shifts and historical biogeography of the cosmopolitan and highly diverse subfamily Lobelioideae (Campanulaceae)
Authors: Antonelli, Alexandre
Issue Date: 26-Nov-2009
Publication type: article, peer reviewed scientific
Organization: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Citation: BMC Biology. 2009 Nov 26;7(1):82
Abstract: Abstract Background The tendency of animals and plants to independently develop similar features under similar evolutionary pressures - convergence - is a widespread phenomenon in nature. In plants, convergence has been suggested to explain the striking similarity in life form between the giant lobelioids (Campanulaceae, the bellflower family) of Africa and the Hawaiian Islands. Under this assumption these plants would have developed the giant habit from herbaceous ancestors independently, in mu... more
ISBN: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1741-7007-7-82
ISSN: 1741-7007
Description: © 2009 Antonelli; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/26567
Appears in Collections:Articles / Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

This item has been viewed 3 times.

 

 

© Göteborgs universitet 2011